Accountability

Every week I get an email from MapMyRide with my weekly training summary. It’s almost never totally devoid of some form of activity – I walk for part of my commute every day so at the very least I’ve put 5 miles under my belt each week. The only times it’s completely blank is if I have been on vacation, like the time my husband and I vacationed in Seattle with two of our very good friends. I did a LOT of walking that week – but didn’t bother to track it because I’m ON VACATION.

But it definitely serves as a reminder that I’m not out riding (or hiking or walking) as much as I want to be.

Desire is good. Obsession is not.

You can’t forsake all else for the pursuit of a selfish desire. As much as you need time to do your own thing, you have others who need you to be there with them. My kids, my dogs, my husband, my family, my friends, my boss, my subordinates, my peers, the local music scene (I love going to shows) – all need my attention at some level or another. As I’ve said before, it’s all about balance.

I say this because I read other cyclists’ blogs and sometimes get wistful at the time they have devoted to their passion. I have to remind myself that not only am I not them, but I’m also (generally) not in the same generational bracket. Most of my group ride partners are around my parent’s ages – and rightfully so. They have raised their kids, they did their time of juggling work and play, and now have more time to just play. They paid their dues and reap the reward. I want to be fit enough to go on long bike rides when I’m in my 50s and 60s and decent clips.

The other thing is I am not a morning person and no matter how much I love riding, I loath getting up early to hit the road before it gets too hot and sticky out. There isn’t enough coffee in the world to make me happy about getting up before 9 or 10 am.

All that being said – I’m excited to be riding with my son tomorrow morning – a brisk 25 miles together through Bucks County, Pennsylvania. This afternoon will be all about prepping the bikes, getting the hitch loaded on the truck, deciding if I want to ride this on my hybrid (which will match his speed better and be a “better” “workout” ha ha) or my road bike (which will make the ride easier). Laying out our gear, pre-loading the coffee maker, and picking up snacks and drop-ins for our water bottles (it will be cooler but still mid-80s by the end of the ride). Guiding him through his first supported cycling event.

Bucks County is home to only 12 covered bridges still standing.
Bucks County is home to only 12 covered bridges still standing.
(photo credit: http://fmyphotos.com/history-bucks-county-covered-bridges)

 

See you on the road!

Traveling with Your Bike

I’m heading out with my road bike next week to ride the 34 mile route at the Elephant Rock Ride in Castle Rock, CO. Dropped my bike off with the experts at Guy’s Bicycles in Feasterville-Trevose, PA for a tune-up and box into an airline case. Everyone has horror stories about traveling with their bikes – oversize and overweight fees that are close to a round-trip ticket price.

I’m flying Frontier Airlines, a Denver, CO-based low fare airline for three reasons:

1. They have incredibly bicycle-friendly policies.

Bicycles, golf equipment, skis, & snowboards are subject to the checked baggage fees and overweight fees above (oversize fees are exempt).

Checked Baggage Fees vary based on the type of Fare Option you purchase and for EarlyReturns® members with Summit and Ascent level status:

Domestic and International* Economy Classic Classic Plus Summit, Ascent
1st $20 Free Free Free
2nd $20 Free Free Free
3rd and more (each) $50 $50 $50 $50
Overweight Baggage Fee (any items weighing more than 50 pounds) $75

2. They are affordable and still provide great service.

3. I achieved status with them last year so I get perks.

I’ll be recapping my experience once I’m on the other side.

Please comment if you know of other bicycle-friendly airlines so we can get the word out and support airlines that make it easier (or more affordable) to take your bike on new adventures.

Anniversary Retrospective

Yesterday was my first anniversary of buying a bike, hitting the bike path and enjoying the ride. So much has happened in the last year, it’s hard to believe it’s only been a year. And yet, it’s been an entire year!

In celebration (and because it was a Tuesday) I rode with fellow Philly Bike Club members for a D/C- recovery ride out of Glenside. The five of us had a wonderful jaunt through Jenkintown, Abington Township, into Philadelphia and back through Melrose Park and Elkins Park. I love it when my phone battery doesn’t die on my mid-ride so I can check out where I’ve been post-ride. Since I’m so clueless about where the heck I am out here.

Something about no permanent geological fixture to indicate West.

Friday I completed a 50 mile ride with two other women and three guys. It was a slight stretch in that I posted a 12.7 mph average but wasn’t totally wrecked by the effort. I’m hoping to get to a solid 13-14 mph average by the end of the summer over that length – including hills. Last week’s final mileage was just a touch over 100 miles for the week over three rides, of which I am fairly proud. Longer distances are becoming easier as part of my mission to be more conscious of my energy output. Focus on smooth fluid pedaling, not raw exertion.

Taking a look at my stats over the past year …

  • May 2011 – I bought my Specialized Crossroads Sport hybrid. That first week, I went on three rides for a total of 28 miles with an average of 7.3 mph.
  • June 2011 – My first month I went on twelve rides for a total of 157.61 miles with an average of 8.06 mph. I am most proud of the 34.89 mi ride with a 12 mph average because it was on my hybrid. I was such a wreck at the end of that ride but felt so accomplished.
  • July 2011 – Month Two was dominated by longer rides – not as many shorter rides with the kids. I also shifted to 3-4 rides per week. Total mileage was 123.62 with an average of 8.25 mph.
  • August 2011 – After three months, I had improved my average speed to 9.93 mph. Fewer rides, but longer distances dominated.
  • September 2011 – Month Four marked the end of the summer and my first Half-Century ride with my girl friend – and another gain in average speed to 11.98 mph.
  • October 2011 – Month Five saw only three rides, as it was getting colder and we were in the process of selling our house. Less time riding, more time fixing up the house. Only 37.65 miles this month with an average of 8.6 mph.
  • November 2011 – Six months on the hybrid and we got an offer on our house! My favorite ride was Thanksgiving Day – I headed out before eating. The city is eerily quiet with all the stores closed, barely any cars on the roads. I encountered only one other cyclist on that ride. It was also cold enough to make breathing feel horrible, like my alveoli had become tiny ice pops. Two rides for a total of 39.47 miles, 10.77 mph average.
  • December 2011 – not a single ride because we packed up and moved across the country. No big loss, since it was also single-digit temperatures, icy and snowy in Colorado!
  • January 2012 – New state, new house, new community, no clue where to go or what to do. Joined Philly Bike Club. Two rides, 4.7 miles with an average of 5 mph. And colder temperatures – mid-forties!
  • February 2012 – three rides around the neighborhood for a total of 14.3 miles and recovering my average to 8.43 mph. Joined Sturdy Girl Cycling.
  • March 2012 – Only one ride! 10.6 mph average. Whee! But then I purchased my new Felt ZW5. Now I feel like I can get out and ride with the rest of he civilized cycling world.
  • April 2012 – The weather is getting amazing and staying above 50 degrees. Took a Beginner Cycling Clinic and feel more confident on my road bike. 116.5 miles with an average of 10.26 mph. Starting to see big swings in average speed depending on my bike (12 mph as opposed to 8-10 mph).
  • May 2012 – This month has been great so far – 142.3 miles with an average of 9.63. Road bike averages are closer to 12mph; hybrid 8-9 mph.

One year total: 898.09 miles.

So what are my goals for Year Two?

  1. Improve to a consistent 13-14 mph average on my road bike.
  2. Accomplish a metric century (62 miles).
  3. Accomplish three-quarters of a century (75 miles).
  4. Ride at least twice a week with groups.
  5. Ride on weekends with my kids – it still feels good to go slow and enjoy the scenery. And getting a treat mid-ride or post-ride doesn’t hurt either.

See you on the road!

The Bike Matters

This weekend I decided to ride my hybrid bike to meet some girl friends for brunch on Saturday morning. I chose my hybrid because a 3 mile section of the route goes through a park that has a path of dirt and rocks – not exactly skinny-tire friendly. The rest is all on-street or paved bike path riding.

A wonderful 15 mile ride in, then a 10 mile ride around Fairmount Park before we rode off to eat.  We got a great table by an open window and enjoyed good food and a beautiful day. We then parted ways and I slogged through the 15 miles back home – it was uphill almost the entire way. At the end of the 3 miles of dirt and rocks, there is a 1.32 mile section of the road that is a 2% average incline – not insurmountable but certainly a challenge for any novice cyclist. Especially on a hybrid.

Image

Let’s talk about bicycle weights here for a second. My hybrid bike is 34 pounds. My road bike is 17 pounds. When you are going uphill, you can definitely feel the weight difference. Where my road bike flies, my hybrid is sluggish. It’s like being with a couch potato (hybrid) or a fitness freak (road).

But to be clear – I ask a lot of my hybrid. It has no business doing 40 miles in a morning – it’s built for casual rides around town running errands or leisurely rides with my kids.

Couple this with my hybrid has platform pedals (the flat ones) whereas my road bike has dual-sided pedals that my shoes clip into, thus transferring power from my legs to the bike. Everyone said clipless pedals would change my life but I wasn’t convinced until I had them l and could literally feel myself become one with my bike and power up a hill. It’s a truly incredible feeling – I highly recommend it.

A key difference also is my hybrid has a triple crank (three front rings) where my road bike has a compact crank (2 front rings). This means I was able to get into the lowest of low gears to slowly but surely get to the top of the hill. I was already pretty fatigued from the earlier riding, which didn’t help the cause any.

Anyway ….the point being your gear can make or break a ride. I was wrecked and spent the rest of the day rehydrating and relaxing. Next time I head downtown for brunch I need to scope a road route so I don’t completely kill my body.

Or maybe I should think of it as really good training? I used to think a ride was only good if you felt wrecked afterwards – but even after 50 miles on my road bike I don’t feel totally wrecked. I like being able to function after a ride.

Today my kids and I went on a 5 mile ride on a beautiful bike path and it was fantastic. They all have mountain bikes so my hybrid was the right choice for gear. I matched my daughter’s pace at 5 mph and it was truly a fun, low-key ride. Exactly what my hybrid is built for.

* * * * *

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there! Hope you enjoyed your day as much as I did.

Just the Basics

Yesterday I participated in a skills clinic for novice female cyclists organized by my local female-centric cycling club – Sturdy Girls Cycling. I’ve ridden my (super-sexy) road bike for about a month now so it’s a perfect opportunity to break my bad habits before they take hold.

A wide range of women participated – some on hybrids and urban bikes, some preparing for a triathlon or two, some who just bought a bike and others who just wanted to know how to make their ride more efficient. I fit into the latter two categories – my bike is a pretty recent acquisition and I’m still learning how to use her optimally.

We started out the day with a short jaunt to an empty parking lot for basic drills. Like starting and stopping. Riding a straight line. Looking behind you without weaving your bike all over the place. Basic stuff that most of us don’t really think about but can have an impact on your success.

I learned that I did indeed need to switch the foot I un-clip upon stops (and managed to fall spectacularly in the early attempts to remember which foot to un-clip and which way to lean).

the ground is hard.

 

At least I got that out of the way early. And I like to think it broke the ice for the rest of the group – there were a few more falls. But most people don’t seem to have a problem with deciding when to un-clip as they roll to a stop. It’s just me over-thinking it.

Note to self: find your comfort zone anticipating the need to un-clip.

We then headed out for a short ride to learn hill climbing skills. The hills we were climbing were manageable and achievable – all good things when you are working on building confidence on your bike. We discussed gearing and how no one can tell you what gear will feel best except through time and practice – but that you will find a gear or a range of gears that will help you stay in motion.

Hills are your friend!

We also discussed Constant Motion – always keeping your legs moving. This builds your ability to keep going, even on super-tough climbs, because your body is accustomed to staying in motion. You can also work on not only using your muscles but also your cardiovascular and respiratory systems to keep from fatiguing your muscles too quickly.

The biggest take-away for me from the hills/gears section was just that – smooth, fluid motion the entire way up the hill. Not how fast or hard I could mash the hill – but how smoothly I could do it.

I spent the rest of the clinic at the back of the group as we practiced riding in lines of two and three. How to merge, not surge. How to find a bail-out point if you need it (and regroup at the top). Common group-riding lingo like” GAP” and “ON.” Why “UP” means getting into an easier gear and “DOWN” means getting into a harder gear.

Being in the back meant I needed to monitor my cadence to maintain a smooth, silky cadence. It was tough for me – I like to just GO already, to get up the hill as fast as possible, effort be damned! Plus, I hate riding behind someone as close as I really need to in a group ride. So worried someone will stop suddenly, causing me to either hit them or veer off and crash or fall down.

Not like I haven’t fallen down in front of a bunch of strangers a few times now or anything.

Quite frankly, riding in a group formation – listening to the hum of the wind in our spokes, hearing the clink of cartridge changes – is pretty sweet.

We ended the clinic with a brown-bag lunch and bike anatomy lesson. How to clean and lube your chain and cassette. Different hand positions on the handlebars (for those of us with road bikes). The importance of having a bike that fits you – frame first, everything else can be swapped or upgraded. Recommended timeline to buy new tires (2000-2500 miles). Taking the reflectors off your bike (dorky – I’m guilty as charged!) and replacing them with bike lights to stay visible.

One more quick group ride around the park and we all went our separate ways.  It also sounds like there may be a longer group ride scheduled for those of us at the clinic so we can get together again to practice our skills in a low-key ride.

I can’t stress how happy I am that I did this clinic – one of the goals was to feel more confident on your bike and I definitely feel better about my skills and how to handle myself in a group ride environment. I met a bunch of other awesome women who a new to think like me.

Now to go find my next group ride …

 

Confidence

Let’s be very clear here: I am not a morning person. I’m not really a late-night person either … but my ideal day involves not getting out of bed until mid-morning (9, 10am) and climbing back into bed around 11pm. Sleep is just too delicious to not indulge on the weekends.

But I also love riding my bike so I sucked it up and woke early to make an 8:30am roll-out time for a women’s group ride at my local bike shop. And honestly, is 8:30 too early in the morning (YES)? I’m usually on the train to work around then!

Today’s group ride was sponsored by Specialized Bicycles – Women’s Ride Day.

Our group of about 8 women (and two guys – the leader and sweep) skewed slightly older than me but no matter – everyone had a great attitude and personality. I started the ride toward the back of the group but quickly realized I’d be happier closer to the front.

The ride itself was relatively flat – so I spent my time working on gearing. Big Ring for the flats, little ring for the hills. I noticed a few times when I geared down too low and was bouncing in the saddle – an adjustment or two later I was transferring power from myself to the bike. It’s a beautiful thing, really. There were a few bigger hills – but I managed to maintain 8-10mph up those hills. The ride felt good.

We got back to the shop in about an hour and only 10 miles. Half the group decided to split but the other half continued on for another 10 miles, coming in a touch less than 2 hours total. The shop had free bagels for us and was handing out free water bottles too (hooray – free gear!).

AND I managed to not fall off my bike! Laura 1, Clipless Pedals, o!

I’m thinking I may actually need to change my unclip pattern from right to left – but didn’t feel brave enough to change it up on this ride. Maybe on a nice, quiet solo ride.

* * * * *

I’ve also signed up for the Greater Philadelphia Bike Challenge! It’s a free, for-fun competition to encourage you to use your bike for transportation, exercise, and recreation this summer. Ride your bike, log your miles, maybe win fabulous prizes but definitely feel awesome about using two-wheeled transportation all summer long.

Being Average

Cycling Ride Levels-

Class Difficulty Rate
Class A Difficult, 45 to 100+ miles 18-20mph average on flat terrain
16-18mph average on rolling/hilly terrain
15-16mph average on very hilly terrain
Class B Advanced, 25 to 90 miles 15-18mph average on flat terrain
13-16mph average on rolling/hilly terrain
12-14mph average on very hilly terrain
Class C Moderate, 15 to 75 miles 12-15mph average on flat terrain
10-13mph average on rolling/hilly terrain
9-11mph average on very hilly terrain
Class D Easy, 10 to 25 miles 8-11mph average on flat terrain
4-7mph average on more hilly terrain

I’m finally recovered for the most part from a cold I contracted a few days after my Super Awesome Fun 50 mile ride a few weekends ago. And I’m looking – itching – to get back out and ride. This weekend is supposed to start nice and gradually decline into cold and rainy.

It’s Saturday and I have time for a ride with some decent mileage. So I pursue the local cycling group pages, searching for something either in my area or in my confirmed speed range. There is a ride scheduled for 10:30am (PERFECT!) at the local bike shop (EVEN BETTER!) at 15+mph average (well junk).

In the group ride community, most of the rides have average speeds set to 14+mph averages. My guess is the assumption is that if you are group riding, you are a more serious cyclist. You have the skills and knowledge to go longer distances in shorter amounts of time. And you want to be with other similarly leveled cyclists to keep you motivated … because inevitably someone will be faster or more graceful or training for a longer/hillier ride.

That’s not to say there aren’t rides for the C-level cyclist. The problem is me.

I want to ride with other people since I don’t know the area very well.

I want to start relatively close to my house so I don’t have to load everything into my car and drive first.

I want to ride on the weekends. Between work and being a mom, weekday rides – daytime and evening – just aren’t in the cards.

I want to improve my skills, speed, and distance (in that order) with friendly people who have similar goals.

In short, I miss cycling with my friends back in Colorado. I knew where I was going, didn’t generally have to drive to a starting point, and could have a very enjoyable time while improving.

In all fairness, I never did a group ride in Colorado because I didn’t have a road bike. I just rode with my friends at whatever pace we were feeling that day. We made terrible decisions sometimes – but we had a great time. I’m looking to recapture that magic.

It will take time and I will continue to look. I signed up for the Sturdy Girl Beginner Cycling clinic in two weeks to improve my skills. Doesn’t help me ease the manic desire to GO RIDE MY BIKE today, but will be beneficial in the long-term.

There are more C-rides planned coming up through Philly Bike Club. I just need to be more flexible in my approach and seek out the rides that I know I can do , have a good attitude, and be willing to make mistakes and have fun.

Someday a 15+mph average won’t be the reason I can’t do a ride.

Just not today.